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Good news – Rick got his bike back. It was found in an apartment across the street from the D’port skatepark. Missing its brakes, but otherwise intact.
Read about it here:
http://www.standardbyke.com/blog/?p=2479

If you’re in the midwest, particularly around Davenport, IA/The Quad Cities, keep your eyes open, for Rick Moliterno’s bike. It was stolen earlier today from the Davenport skatepark. All of you outside of the area, lookout for it on craigslist or ebay. It is a pretty custom ride, with features and parts that only Rick has.

Rick Moliterno's Stolen Standard 20" BMX

Rick Moliterno's stolen Standard 20" BMX

Here’s the info from Rick (Standard Byke Company Owner/BMX Veteran), himself:
My bike was my first and only bike made here in our shop. It had unique engraving on the head tube and drop outs. It had a custom green paint job to match my 1963 Ford Galaxie. The fork had straight cut legs and a freestyle steer tube instead of race. The compression bolt was a sample we never sold.

It had a titanium Standard front peg that is like 10 years old. Oh yeah, the frame has euro bb and a 27.0 seat tube…2 things no other freestyle frames that are up to date have. Man, I loved that damn bike! It had so much I liked plus being the first one from here and being the one I am getting back to riding full time on again….

If you see this bike, let Rick/Standard know via:
info@standardbyke.com
twitter.com/standrdbykeco

UPDATE (092308): The 2005 250S is sold… I’m selling of my frames, bikes and parts, so I thought posting them here, as well as on some of the other BMX sites I frequent wouldn’t be a bad idea at all. Check out the descriptions as well as the images, as I’ve tried to be as detailed and honest about their condition as possible. I’d like to receive payment via PayPal. Email me if you’re interested, or want to see more photos: jeremy (at) bmxroots.com. Thanks for looking.

2005 Standard 250S F/F

Frame #1: 2005 Standard 250S
I didn’t buy this new, but based on research, and the SN starting with 05, this is a 2005 Standard 250S. I sprayed it a flat blue, with a number of coats of matte clear. It could use some sanding if you refinish it. I didn’t wetsand, so it has some fine sanding scratches. It also has some chips and scratches, from riding, but overall is free of dents, dings, cracks, etc.

It has a 21.25″ top tube, standard headtube (no h/s included), 14mm dropouts and a Euro bottom bracket. I’ll throw in a 22mm Primo euro bottom bracket.

SOLD

Here’s a link to the frame built-up in July: Standard 250S

2003 Standard TRLS 250
Frame #2: 2003 Standard TRLS 250
I didn’t buy this one new, either, but I’m pretty sure it is a 2003 – the SN starts with 03. Anyway, it has “the gusset” , which was a feature of Standard frames for many years. It has a 20.5″  top tube, standard headtube (no h/s included), 14mm dropouts and an American bottom bracket (not included). No dents, dings or cracks – just awesome American-Made tubing.

The frame is raw with spray-paint clear. NOTE: The clear is spraypaint, and has some large spots missing where stickers were removed, so should be redone if you decide to keep it this way. It currently has a newer 250L Standard sticker-pack on it.

Looking for $100.00 shipped via USPS in the continental US.

Here’s how I had it built up Last November: Standard TRLS 250

Swobo Del Norte

Alright, I’ll admit it, I’ve got a thing for a new bike. Not just a new bike, but a new kind of bike. See, part of the reason I started this site was because I wanted to not only explore BMX in all of its facets, but also bicycling in general. As I’ve said, I never really felt comfortable on my mountain bike that I had for a few years. Grip-shifters, derailleurs and an oversized frame just didn’t do it for me. I need simplicity. So, that led me to the purchase of my 24″ BMX, then to rebuilding my old 20″ bikes, and to the current-day, with a couple of modern-day 20s at my disposal.

So, about four months ago, I bought my first road bike, ever. Seriously, throughout my life, I had the aforementioned mountain bike, one 26″ beach cruiser, and an AMF pseudo-motocross bicycle when I was really young (a very strange beast), but everything else has been BMX. I picked-up a refurbished and semi-modernized early-80s Trek 710. 700c wheels, a bunch of gears and a leather saddle. Very cool, as it is easy-to-ride and nice and tall, so it fits me quite well. I bought it because I wanted something comfortable to ride long distances, as I find myself hopping on the bike to get around town, as many folks are these days. However, that whole “simplicity” thing keeps interrupting my brain while I’m riding – “Do I NEED all of these gears?” “Man, vintage roadbikes can sure flex” “Hmm, how well will it handle this drop off of this curb?”. On and on I go.

Uh, oh, you’re thinking, here comes the old BMX guy with tales of fixed gear fondness. Not quite. See, I cannot give-in to pedaling all of the time, I’m just not comfortable with it, (at least not yet), and frankly, I love bombing the rather large hills of my town, and hearing the buzz of a freewheel behind my ear. So, I think the single-speed roadbike is where I’m headed. And I’ve got one picked out – the Swobo Del Norte. One gear, two brakes, flip-flop hub (freewheel or fixed), loose bmxish-styling and modern parts/geometry. Yes, I am smitten. There’s a new shop in town that carries the Swobo brand, and I think I might just have to go have a look.

I know that to some, this all may seem a bit random as the site is called BMX Roots. However, as with a ton of riders who ride many different kinds of bikes, my personal roots are in BMX. Yet as long as we’re talking about bikes with wheels that are FUN to ride at their core, then why shouldn’t all types of riding be respected?

Oh, and, just as I was working on this today, I hit the Volume bikes site, where they have photos of both their Creedence fixed-gear bike, and the new Sledgehammer. Maybe I have three bike crushes right now.

Related:
My Standard 250S
My Standard 250L
My 1987 Haro Master on the BMXMuseum

Standard 250S

Doesn’t get much more American than the USA-made blue, white and red Standard Bykes S250 that I just built. Yeah, I know, the majority of the parts are imported, but I built this one on the cheap, and American-made components are getting harder and harder to find.

Check the specs over at the BMXMuseum.

My kids and I just dropped about $100 on fireworks, so it should be a looong night of fire, meat and beer. Perfect. I haven’t shot off my own fireworks since about ’95. For the past few years, my boys were still too young and freaked out by the noise. Plus, we’ll be able to see the community fireworks perfectly from my folks’ house.

For those of you in the US, or ex-pats abroad, Happy Independence Day. Oh, and don’t forget about the red, white and blue Skyway T/A wallpaper I posted last week.

KHE, the German BMX company with roots back to 1988, has a couple of new products out that remind me of how the BMX industry should always look back at its relatively short history for ideas that worked before, and can still work today. Both their Centaur handlebar/stem combo and 1pc seat combo refer back to products that were popular some 20-odd years ago.

KHE Bar/Stem Combo

KHE Centaur circa 2008.

Vector Pro Bars

Vector pro bars circa 1984 – photo by “oldmetal” on the bmxmuseum.

The influence of the Vector bars and Troxel seat are immediately apparent, though with modern geometry, technology and materials, KHE has created something totally new in today’s bmx market. For example, with the seat, by removing the seat guts, they were able to significantly lower the weight and the price will be comparable to a standard saddle alone. With the bars, KHE wants to again create the purest form of a handlebar and stem, again to reduce weight and simplify the number of parts on your bike. The Centaur bar/stem will come in a couple different angles, though the seat will only come in one angle.

KHE Seat/Post Combo

KHE prototype seat/post combo prototype.

Troxel seat

Early ’80s Troxel Comet combo seat/post – photo by “bmxr68″ on the bmxmuseum.

Both of the KHE products should be available in Spring 2008. Will be cool to see how KHE continues to reference the past while offering something new.

New Year, New Bike

Standard 250L

I finally finished my newest bike, a Standard 250L with a 20.75 TT, integrated headset, mid BB and welded-on gyro tabs. I wanted to go with something lighter and with more modern geometry than the Standard 250S I built in October. I picked it up online from Marc at Street Mafia BMX – he’s an old school rider, and a great guy to deal with. I recommend checking out either of their shops, on both coasts, or via their ebay store. Marc custom-ordered this frame from Standard with the unusual top-tube length and gyro tabs.

The bike has been sprayed in a jade/aqua color with a metal-flake clear coat that shows when the light hits it (check the photo below). Really different and I dig it much. The bike rides so well – it is very quick and tight. Though because of the cold-ass weather we’ve been having in Kansas, I’ve only been on it for about 30 minutes since I finished it last weekend. That should change tomorrow, as the weather is supposed to break a bit.

Most of the parts came off the old 250S, but some have been upgraded:

Frame: Standard 250L (Mid BB)
Fork: Hoffman Fat Free with 990 mounts
Bars: S&M Slam XLT
Grips: Odyssey Gedda
Stem: FBM Protect Ya Neck
Headset: FSA Impact
Wheels: Alienation 36H. Black Sheep 14mm with Haro hub and 10T cassette – rear. PBR 3/8″ with Haro Hub – front
Seat, Post, Clamp: Primo seat, Shadow Conspiracy post, Kink clamp
Brakes: Dia-Tech Hombres, Odyssey Monolevers, Odyssey GTX Gyro
Cranks: Primo Hollowbites
Sprocket: Simple Copenhagen 28T
Chain: KMC with halflink
Pedals: S&M one o one
Pegs: 4 of ‘em – Odyssey JPEGs and JPEG lites

Standard 250L Close-up

Standard 250L Close-up Paint

Terrible One Barcode 2008 Colors

Funny, I was just chuckling about the ad on albes.com that says “1988-2008. We’ve been around since the first time neon colors were cool”. See, there was a time in the very recent past when BMX went chrome and black, with a few colors mixed in here or there. I believe it had a lot to do with the fact that not only did painted or anodized colors go out of “fashion”, companies probably cut back on the number of colors available to cut production costs. Pre-X-Games and the recent growth of BMX, companies simplifed yet also fed the desires of the riders who remained at the core of the sport.

Now, there is a virtual cornucopia of colors to be had from most manufacturers. Painted, powdered, anodized – whatever a rider may want, he can have. Or it is common to custom paint the parts, or strip them down to their raw, welded state. Terrible One just released their new colors for the 2008 Barcode frame, and following the desires of their buyers, they’ve got a beautiful robin’s egg blue, and a hot (welded, get it? hehe) clear/raw finish. Their site says that this is just the beginning of things to come for 2008. Also, if you’re near Austin, be sure to head to the T-1 ramp this Saturday for a fakie-air contest. Should be a fine time.

Oh, and I’m right there with the bright colors – I just built a new Standard 250 that was custom-painted a bright jade green. More to come on that…

DVD Cover of Standard Video - Stronger Than AllMayhem and Metal from SBC. Photo by Jeremy Schutte.

As planned, I got the Standard Stronger Than All video in the mail this week from Goodtimes, and I’ve watched it three times since. That’s three times through both DVDs. See, the first one is all about the Standard Army, section after section of their riders, both US and European, tearing it up both on their bikes and off. The footage is cut with archival military footage and some home-grown destruction. The second DVD has separate riding sections from 13 of the guys in the videos. Street, parks and mini-ramps are well-represented here, with a small bit of trail action.

The footage spans a number of years, and you see it in the various styles of riding throughout. Front brake tricks, no brakes, boosts, foot-jams, lip-tricks, rail grinds, giant gaps, flairs, ledge grinds, whips, manuals; they all come fast and with abandon. Guys like John Rodgers, Drew York and Bommel throw down the latest tricks, with massive lines and flow. Vets like Rob Ridge, Jaimy Spreitzer and Rick Moliterno show just how they’ve been getting it done for years. None of the riders featured here currently have podium spots on the X-Dew-Action Tours, nor are they necessarily the riders blogged about or with multi-page magazine interviews. They rip anyway, period. And, there are a number who will be the riders generating the chat on a message board near you, soon.

In these times of HD and exquisitely shot bmx videos, with the bar being raised everyday, there is a certain beauty in the rawness that Standard has delivered with Stronger Than All. Some of the night riding is lit with flares, a couple of the edits appear to be self-shot, and the DVD menu, or lack therof, makes me crazy. Yet what matters to me is that STA makes me want to put on my headphones, crank the Dead Kennedys, and ride like hell. This video is purely about riding and pushing what can be done on a 20-inch bmx. Make notes when watching it – this video will remind you of how much fun you should be having on your bike.

Get it for $19.95 plus shipping from Goodtimes, now, though I’m sure it will be available other places soon. Check out the following promo videos that Standard put out in 2006-07 teasing the release of STA.




When I was visiting family over the holidays in Davenport, Iowa, I hit the Goodtimes Superstore (also the home to Standard), as I always do when I’m up there. I got to check out the artwork (created by 57Even) for the new Standard Byke Company video, Stronger Than All. They didn’t have the video in stock, quite yet, but it is now, and I’ve got one on the way to my mailbox.

It has been eight years since Standard has released a team video, and based on everything I’ve heard as well as the preview video that has been on YouTube for a while, I have no reason to think that it will be anything less than outta control. I’ll have a full review as soon as the DVDs arrive and I dig into it.

Head over to the Goodtimes site to check out all of the details, and order one up by calling them direct. There’s also a sneak peek at some new SBC product on the site as well.

Stronger Than All Video

Dennis McCoy, 1988 AFA Flatland Finals
Dennis McCoy grabbed from a video by krtschmidt.

Kurt Schmidt has a great site with a bunch of vintage freestyle info, and a ton of videos that he has put on YouTube. His most recent videos feature Eddie Fiola, Woody Itson, Dennis McCoy and Rick Moliterno at the 1988 AFA Finals in Wichita, KS. I wasn’t at this contest, though it was only a few hours away from my home in Kansas City, but some of my friends went, and I remember how stoked they were when they got back. You can hear the crowd just LOSING it over the tricks being pulled, something you don’t hear as much on the televised spectacles of today, even as guys are pulling triple-tailwhips – perhaps because the tricks are just SO big today…

Interesting to see the different styles between the four riders. Moliterno and DMC just fly through so many of the rolling tricks that were becoming popular at that time, whereas Woody and Fiola pull more of the power-moves that helped progress freestyle past the balance tricks and hopping of the early-80s.

I believe Schmidt filmed these videos, as he was deep in the freestyle scene of the mid-80s and 90s, and has the knowledge, history and footage to prove it. In 1991, he formed Standard Industries with Rick Moliterno and Bill Nitschke.

Check out krtschmidt.com, and then jump over to his YouTube collection. Make sure you have some spare time available. You’ll be there a while.

SBC Fork Designs

Standard Byke Company Shank and Race Fork graphics by 57 Even.

Well, since I’ve been on a Standard kick, with the build of my 250 over the past few weeks, I thought I’d fill you in on some very cool stuff that I’ve dug up about what’s coming up with Rick, Jess and the crew as we head into 2008.

First up is the news that the new shop that they’re building in Davenport is coming together quite well. I was in Davenport visiting family last week and visited the Goodtimes store, where I heard from Ryan that they’ve built a couple forks and are moving quickly to getting frames into production. Hopefully, I’ll be doing a feature on here about the shop in December.

Hot on the heels of this are some new graphics and apparel that 57 Even has worked up for Standard, and it all looks rad. 57 Even has been making a name for themselves in the bmx/skate/street culture. I’ve been watching their work since I started seeing it on the Standard site – they’ve done the graphics for the parts, apparel and site for the past few years – and it has been great to see them pickup other clients and adapt to their brands, while remaining true to their style, which is based in a hand-crafted collage approach. Have a look, and enjoy. You can see all of their work (I swear they don’t sleep – I think that is part of their mantra, actually) at: 57even.com

Standard Byke Co. Skull T-Shirt Design 2008

Standard Byke Company Skull t-shirt and poster by 57 Even. Check the details with the Standard logos and the textures that build the depth of the image.

2007 Standard 250L Frame

I’m running these on my 250, even though my frame is a couple years old – 2007 Standard Byke Company 250L frame graphics by 57 Even.

My new build - Standard 250

So, my posts have been really lacking lately, and I think it has been with good reason – at least to other riders – maybe not so much to my wife. ;-)

I’ve been building a new bike, and I’m really happy with how it has turned out. It is my first non-complete new(er) school ride, and I’m getting ready to take it out on its shakedown ride as soon as I finish this post.

The frame was raw, but the clearcoat was in rough shape. I sanded it down and sprayed a number of coats of clear, so it has protection and a light shine. I dig how the color combination turned out very hand-made looking overall – dare I say almost traditional hot-rod style.

Frame: Standard 250 (American BB)
Fork: S&M Pitchfork with brake bosses (Yeah, I’m a part of the front-brake revolution – heh)
Bars: S&M Slam XLT
Grips: Odyssey Team
Stem: FBM Protect Ya Neck
Wheels: Haro 48s and Haro Directional Tires (From my Retro Sport – will be switching to some Odyssey Hazards, I think)
Seat, Post, Clamp: Haro (I’ve got a Primo Seat and a Shadow Conspiracy Post on the way), Kink Clamp
Brakes: Dia-Tech Hombre Brake, Odyssey Monolever, Odyssey GTX Gyro
Cranks: Primo Hollowbites
Sprocket: Tree
Chain: KMC
Pedals: S&M one o one

I sold my FST and some other vintage parts to fund this build, and I couldn’t be happier with my decision. Not to worry, though (I’m talking to you old schoolers), I’ve got a bunch of other builds planned now that old man winter has arrived. Thanks to those over at bmxmuseum.com who sold me parts, and bought other ones, and thanks to eBay for being like a bad addiction…

More photos to come…

Albe's Video Contest Image
Albe’s – a great mail-order shop in the Detroit area, with serious roots in bmx – is having a video contest to get its users to make their next commercial for them. The winner gets a $500 gift certificate.

Pretty cool idea, and something I haven’t seen done a lot in the BMX industry to this point. Probably because there aren’t many manufacturers with the kind of ad spending necessary to do broadcast commercials with any sort of reach. However, with more online video outlets focusing on BMX, the short feature/video ads will become more standard practice. A ton of companies are taking this approach on sites like Vital BMX and Ride BMX. This ad will run in the next issue of Props Video Magazine.

User generated video content has been all the rage for a few years now with corporate marketing departments – some have nailed it, some have fallen beyond flat, and some are questionable (regardless of your political affiliation – we’ll see how ol’ Mitt’s campaign does). When user created videos really work is when the creators are passionate about the brand, the brand category, and have a built-in desire to create. In Albe’s case, I think they’ve got all of these ingredients to make this contest work. I’ll update the site with the entries as they come in.

From the Albe’s Site about the contest:
Here’s the chance all you aspiring Spielbergs, Tarantinos and Singletons have been waiting for. Props Video Mag let us know that the deadline for our next commercial is coming up but we’re way too busy to put one together so we’re asking one of you do it for us. Of course the winning submission will be paid handsomely in the form of a $500 Albe’s gift certificate but we’ll warn you that it’s gonna take a bit of creativity to be chosen to represent us. If we just wanted thirty seconds worth of dorks doing turn downs we could do that ourselves, we want something more unique. Silly, funny, mysterious, weird, thought provoking, cool, odd, interesting, whatever…have some fun. Sure there can be some riding in it if you like but in order to cut the mustard it better stand out. Make sure it’s 30 seconds long and has our name and web address in it somewhere. Now get crackin’… the entry deadline is October 26th. The rules are below.

Entries should be uploaded to youtube at www.youtube.com and a link e-mailed to us at albesbmxstore@aol.com along with your name and address so we can check it out.
The winner will have to be able to supply us with the video ad on a mini DV tape within a few days of being notified as the winner.
The best ad (as judged by us) will get $500 credit here at Albe’s
The 3 best non-winning ads will be posted here on www.albes.com
Have fun…don’t get hurt and try not to get arrested
Read the paragraph above to see what we are looking for.
If you have any questions e-mail us at albes@aol.com
We reserve the right to cancel / end this contest whenever we like if people nit pick and make it no fun.

Downloads

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